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Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)
of separation and it's my pleasure to join us here and many of us know that we are such a lucky city, and we are lucky because people around their world make their way to fraction, find hopey until the city they know that we celebrate our diversity and find strength in the different cultures that pretend together and now, i ask you also to bring me talent from the arab america communities to make me and help me lune run the city. yes, it's incredible. union, i think i can talk about how wonderful diversity is, but we have to get the talent from our communities to represent all of the different thing that we do in the city. and you know, tonight, even though there is something called a baseball game out there, but these wonderful events that we have in the city whether it's america's cup whether it's fleet week, whether it's the 49ers playing or the giants playing, even eventually when we land the superbowl it all board of trustees all of us, i know that what i'm doing as a mayor and making sure that i support smallbitions in the city is helpful to the america arab community because all of
sure we have a motion in front of us first. >> i moved it. >> moved and seconded? >> second. >> second. the motion is before us. >> david filcoff. thank you for the discussion. i'm excited about this policy. i get very excited about commission policy. i may be the only one, but hey. so, i was -- >> careful with the podium. >>> yes, sorry. i'm sorry i was actually not at the cac meeting last month because it was just before a jewish holiday. but i had some quick comments on this. i'm very supportive of the proposal, but just had some minor tweaks. on page 1 of the policy itself under personnel management, it says personal costs, i believe that should probably read "personnel costs." with regard to commissioner moran's amendment, if just want to be careful that we're not requiring some particular set of findings in the budget adoption resolution for each increase and each enterprise or any particular line item that exceeds the cost of inflation if that -- if the intent -- and i understand it, with the intent that there be some general statement in an adopted budget that makes those kinds
will get to know him and talk about the toughest issues facing them. thank you for joining us today. tell us about your background. >> my parents immigrated to the united states in the 1960's. i was the first kid born in the u.s. my parents sacrificed everything so that their kids could have the opportunities that they wanted when they came here. i grew up in the boston area and lived in different parts of boston. i went to catholic price school in dorchester, a section of boston. -- i went to catholic high school in dorchester, a section of boston. because of my parents, my brothers and i were all blessed to go to harvard university. that is where i went to school. it was intense. i stayed there for law school and have a master's in public policy from there. those are subjects i decided to study because i was interested in public service and public policy issues and government. >> you grew up in the boston area. what made you want to make the transition and moved to san francisco? what motivated you to get involved in politics question marks before i ran for office, and worked in san fra
to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorrow and investing that savings and. that is what we have to do. i think it is a tough order of this matter of innovation is part of it. but also getting us to come together. we can talk about regulation and pension and taxes and the government. a lot of that is [inaudible] a survey said housing prices are too high and that is a negative factor on recruitment. i thought, maybe we can bring the prices down. foreclosure works magic. i do not think you want that. you want rising wealth which could translate into a rising houses -- housing prices. you can increase density and breakdown similar rules, you get more people. there's a lot of things. as i drove down here from oakland cut -- oakland, i saw those cars in the ordinary lanes. one pe
to happen. most of us here are pretty much aware of california's budget crisis. can you give us a quick briefing on where colorado is and what you are trying to do to turn things around? >> our budget is just as dressed as almost every state in the country. we have been working trying to control costs, get our pension funds in line, our state employees have not had a raise in four years. it has been difficult all the way around. the real challenge has been to try and turn public sentiment and get people to recognize it without a strong economy. it will not solve any of these problems. we have been relentless in what we did, the bottom up process and we asked them what they wanted to have as their economic future. and try to -- we had 13,that pal over the state and trying to find an economic vision for the state county by county. how do we become more pro- business? we heard people wanted to -- safety and more pro-business and less red tape and access to capital. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resort
royal armies; other irish influx arrived from the u.s. for the construction of railroads used to transport sugar cane to the sugar plantations. that was at the end of the 19th century. and then at the beginning of the 20th century, we're talking 1902, 1910, before odono that i mentioned before, this man who gave his name to -- he was very proud of this lighthouse. the cubans offer hospitality to general alexander alejandro o'reilly. he rose through the ranks of the spanish army. the spanish sent alexander o'reilly to cuba to form a militia. he was appointed governor of louisiana and head of the army later on. he arrived in august, 1769, and took formal possession of louisiana for spain. think of new orleans and cuba, in particular havana, governors there were also in cuba so there was all this traveling from one city to another because later when i got my ph.d. from tulaine university and i went to the irish channel. it's interesting, the irish history connected with new orleans. so the o'reilly family has been in louisiana for centuries. in cuba, nobody remembers him but it w
used is not in educational out comes it is in per pupil. we rank 47th. >> as a result we rank 50 as the number of counselors and the number of nurses in our schools and the number of libranias in. you get what you pay for. >> our state has been starved for cash for the past ten years as a result of tax cuts the state could not afford that the prior governor put on the credit cards. we need to provide significantly more funding not only through k-12 education which is the birth right of every child to be able to get a quality public education in my opinion and to be able to pursue the dream of a higher education and that is getting further and further out of the reach of children in california because the state does not support education. we need funding, we need to spend it on education. >> so, therefore, do you think that community colleges should perhaps change their focus? one idea is to focus on retraining unemployed workers and upgrading skills for new jobs. do you feel that the state should encourage this? and how? >> if you are making reference to the challenges facing the
. now you have a different name for a period in his third party power production using power in a driving way to recapture the most efficient way. innovation is important. i have to also, every time we heard the word innovation, i have to put a plug in for tradition. i have a very traditional education. i spent a lot of years in silence speaking latin up in the hills, living within the medieval framework. i do respect the past. we study it. if you are grounded in tradition, you feel quite confident in change and innovation. if you are insecure, you are very reluctant to embrace the unknown. i do think we need to in our education and politics, we have to have a new appreciation for our traditions and the patterns that describe our culture and our being as americans. having said all that, we have saved in california tens of billions in energy efficiency. when i first adopted those, people reacted negatively. we pushed ahead. and now in california we have ab 32. signed by a republican actor turned governor. promoting something i pick up on and promote further. the number of peop
volleyball program is available at richmond rec center. please visit us onli>> and it is my hoo introduce governor jerry brown of california. i think. ok. in ibm research, one of the things we talk about is our laboratories. i have been all over the world, live in different countries. i am a relatively recent transplant to california. i would like to let the governor know that i am happy to be here. it is a good space. recently, governor brown has spent a lot of time, focus, and effort making california a better place. focus on eliminating waste, increasing efficiency, decreasing the budget deficit, and real focus that we appreciate in northern california on clean energy. for example, moving the state's goal to be 33% clean energy producing. it is my privilege to welcome governor brown to the panel. [applause] >> and to introduce our next panelist, i would like to welcome steve ballmer, senior bp -- vp. >> good morning and thank you. next up is governor hickel lipper -- hickenlooper. he is the serieaal a entreprener each of you have in your respective parts. he became very succe
also thank both leagues for bringing us together today and also it is a real pleasure to be here with miss dillan who is a great respectful of her party and an activist in the community. as i think that most californians know that we have spent a lot of time dealing with the issue of pension reform for the public sector workers and i think that we have reached a point where we can going forward deal with pensions in a much more sustain able fashion so that we won't see cities in particular having upwards of 25, 30 percent of the general fund having to go to pension obligations. of course, those promises already made must legally be adhered to. i have also said in a lot of time in this past year, looking at private sector employees in publicly traded corporations, who have seen their benefits wiped out and in many cases actually stolen by top executives who are shifting significant amounts of money to their benefit at the expense of those workers. >> thank you, the time limits are tough, aren't they? >> the next question for mr. leno is state proposition 35, asks if the definition
deported from this country, that is a public safety issue that all of us who live in san francisco have to deal with every day. so i really question whether one can square one of those statements with the other. i believe in the natural law from john stewart mill and other philosophers that our rights do not flow from the government, the government's rights and the government's rights flow from the citizens. and so the government should have as limited a scope as possible, not and interfere with business and not interfere with our privacy and not spy on us and generally keep the public order and that is about it. >> thank you, so following up on that one of those things that the government is involved in right now is the educational system. and california used to have an education system that was the envy of the nation. how do you feel we get that back? >> well, it is a tragedy that what used to be one of the top systems in the country is now i think, 47th according to a recent standard that i saw. the senator and folks in his party in sacramento believe that spending more is the answer
sponsored by our attorney general harris this past year, which expands asset forfet tour, it is a way for us to quickly gain resources so that we can provide services for victims and invest in greater public safety police officers and investigator to deal with these crimes. i am opposed to prop 35, number one because the author of it is the single individual, deep pocket putting this forward. it is not a citizen's initiative. never came to talk to me what was wrong or short with our bill that he had to go to the ballot and expanding the definition to those who have to register as sex offenders to include those who have not even committed a sex crime, i think delutes the benefit of our sex registry. >> i think that the support for 35 is a no-brainer. i support 35. i do agree that the problem with sex trafficking in our society in california is a very significant one. in san francisco is frankly the epi center of sex trafficking industry. and i find it interesting that the attorney general participated with the senator in his abnormal legislation and she did not do much about sex trafficking w
which is probably when we would most likely need to buy this stuff, it gives us some price flexibility there. >> right. to the extent that we are low on hydro -- california is low on hydro, and, so, market prices are going to be up overall as a result. >> thank you. >> what is the impact of the deductions on solar utilization? have we measured that? tax deductions that are -- >> have we measured that? we certainly realize that it lowers the cost. >> right. >> and that's why we pursued a third-party for our development of the sunset solar project. >> okay. >> and didn't fund it ourselves. i can't recall off the top of my head, maybe you do, todd, what the -- mr. reedstrom, what the financial impact of that was for us. >> it was pretty significant. by way of comparison, the tax credit, tax credit financing that we successfully undertook for current sunset solar brought the average cost per kilowatt hour down to 23-1/2 cents. that compares to average costs of our hydro system. all the costs included of about 9 cents. so, without the tax
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17 (some duplicates have been removed)